About

“I want to make beautifully useful things that provide real and meaningful benefits to the people and communities that use them.” -Me

I’m not one to talk about myself, so I’ll start with my parents. My mom is an artist, my dad an engineer. A few years ago I realized that it only makes sense that they bred a UX designer. Their lifetime of influence means that at my core is an analytical attention to detail, balanced with a deep appreciation for aesthetic.

Being part of the department of Journalism, Media, and Computing at Creighton University taught me to think of design as a powerful tool for communication. Joining AIGA and serving on the board of directors for AIGA Nebraska has furthered this idea as I’m surrounded by people using design as a vital force for good.

I’ve been fortunate enough in my career to work with a wide range of companies of various sizes and across diverse industries. In doing so, I’ve gotten a pretty good idea of what work resonates most, what feels most meaningful and fulfilling to me. In short, I want to make beautifully useful things that provide real and meaningful benefits to the people and communities that use them. I love the idea of presenting information in novel and approachable ways to help foster innovation. I’m able to dive deep into details to understand the complexity of a system, to flush out all probable use cases (and some improbable ones, too), and to come out with a holistic view of what the best solution might look like.

“Who quotes herself in an about page?” -Also Me

Aside from design, I love making connections with people in other ways as well. I spent two years volunteering as a Big Sister with Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Midlands where I got to spend time with an incredibly bright (and humorously sarcastic) young woman. I’ve also stumbled into (quite literally) the practice of acro yoga. The trust you build while working with another person in such a physically challenging way is just as beautiful as the poses you create.

Anyway, this monologue has gone on long enough. If you’re still reading, thank you! Now why don’t we chat?